Marine Science Association @ Boston University

Interviewing for Success Workshop tomorrow, 4/17!

Hey MSA,

Although we don’t have a normal meeting scheduled for this week, we did sign us up for an
Interviewing for Success workshop at the Center for Career Development. The workshop is from 6-7 pm Thursday, April 17th in Room 101 at 100 Bay State Road. This workshop is relevant to anyone so feel free to bring your friends!

fuckyeahaquaria:

Cuttlefish eating a Filefish | Sepiida eating a Monacanthidae
(by FrogfishPhotos)

fuckyeahaquaria:

Cuttlefish eating a Filefish | Sepiida eating a Monacanthidae

(by FrogfishPhotos)

Meeting at NEAQ tomorrow!!

Hi MSAers,

This weeks meeting will be at The New England Aquarium for one of their lectures called Forage Fish: Now and in the Future with Tess Geers. Please register at: 
http://support.neaq.org/site/Calendar?id=105283&view=Detail
Also lets us know you are coming so we can wait for you:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1fBHa-fpsTMtWSnVKUh6GBqCnFp7s8IF1IGTtdtRo4-o/viewform
We will be meeting outside of BRB at 6 pm and will leave promptly at 6:10. Please be there on time! The lecture starts at 7:00 pm so if you are getting there on your own, plan accordingly. 
If you are finding your own way there please keep in mind that Government Center is closed so you will either have to walk from Park Street (it’s only 0.5 miles to the aquarium from there) or switch to the Orange Line and then the Blue Line. 
See you all Thursday!
-MSA E-board 
fuckyeahaquaria:

Garden Eels | Heterocongrinae

“Tightening its very muscular body to make itself rigid, a garden eel drives its pointy tail deep into the sandy sea floor. The skin in the tail contains a hard substance, so it isn’t hurt. Once the eel is deep enough, it wiggles its dorsal fin, pushing sand out of the hole. Slime from their skin cements the walls of their burrows, preventing cave-ins. Like many other reef animals, garden eels escape from predators by diving tail-first into reef-bottom burrows. When they’re not hiding, these fish sway in the current like blades of seagrass. Each eel lives in a single burrow, which they rarely ever leave.”  -

(by Mickle Huang)

fuckyeahaquaria:

Garden Eels | Heterocongrinae

Tightening its very muscular body to make itself rigid, a garden eel drives its pointy tail deep into the sandy sea floor. The skin in the tail contains a hard substance, so it isn’t hurt. Once the eel is deep enough, it wiggles its dorsal fin, pushing sand out of the hole. Slime from their skin cements the walls of their burrows, preventing cave-ins. Like many other reef animals, garden eels escape from predators by diving tail-first into reef-bottom burrows. When they’re not hiding, these fish sway in the current like blades of seagrass. Each eel lives in a single burrow, which they rarely ever leave.”  -

(by Mickle Huang)

theoceaniswonderful:

Manta Ray with Freeloader 1716 by jrixunderwater

theoceaniswonderful:

Manta Ray with Freeloader 1716 by jrixunderwater

montereybayaquarium:

An Ancient Fascination

Octopuses and their kin, sea creatures known collectively as cephalopods, have grabbed hold of our collective imagination for thousands of years.

We share this fascination as manifested in art, literature and contemporary culture in “Tentacles: The Astounding Lives of Octopuses, Squid and Cuttlefishes.” Highlights include:

  • A steampunk-style sculpture made from raised copper and brass with glass in the Japanese technique called “Tankin.”
  • Ancient Minoan pottery replicas painted with cephalopod designs.
  • An illustration from Jules Verne’s Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea.
  • A drawing of octopuses attacking a fleet of ships, depicted as fact by a French naturalist in 1803.
  • A highly detailed drawing of cephalopods by famed naturalist Ernst Haeckel.
  • Glass models of squid and octopuses by father-son team of Leopold and Rudolph Blaschka.
  • A replica of the famous abstract work, The Birth of the Cephalopods, by Mark Rothko.
  • A dramatic depiction of a sea of ammonites 73 million years ago.
  • A replica of the intriguing yet slightly disturbing image of Contessa with Squid by Omar Rayyan.
  • Cephalopod tattoo art.

We also commissioned San Francisco Bay Area artist Nemo Gould to create three kinetic sculptures for “Tentacles” using found objects. Gould has transformed a jumble of junk into delightful dioramas that carry conservation messages delivered through a sense of wonderment.

Tentacles" opens April 12.

astronomy-to-zoology:

Ambon Crinoid Shrimp (Laomenes amboinensis)

…a species of crinoid shrimp that occurs in waters off of Indonesia, Queensland, New Caledonia, The Marshall Islands, the Ryukyu Islands and Papua New Guinea. As its common name suggests this species lives in association with feather stars (Crinoidea) living in between its many arms. Feeding on any organic particles that happen to fall near it. Like other crinoid shrimp the coloration of this species is highly varied and usually matches the color of its host.

Classification

Animalia-Arthropoda-Crustacea-Malacostraca-Decapoda-Caridea-Palemonidae-Laomenes-L. amboinensis

Images: Scubaluna and Wharmut

(via eduardo-)

Meeting this Thursday!

Join us on Thursday at 6:00 pm in BRB 113 for a lecture by BUMP professor Nathan Stewart!  He will be telling us all about his research in the Arctic and how he got there. You can expect awesome stories and delicious pizza. 
Fill out this poll for pizza:
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1AgKdDUeGOoVuf3DExXoN4OSeZg1U4yO4q43YzEozy4A/viewform
See you then, 
Marine Science Association
Morgan Corner, President
Kristin Yoshimura and Diana Acosta, Vice Presidents
Katie O’Neill, Treasurer
Rebecca Murillo, Secretary
Ryan Schosberg, Media and Technology Chair
Elizabeth Shaffer, Fundraising Chair
mothernaturenetwork:

Salmon find their homes using magnetic fields, innate internal mapScientists are working to determine just how precise the Chinook salmon’s personal GPS actually is when it comes to returning to ancestral feeding grounds.

mothernaturenetwork:

Salmon find their homes using magnetic fields, innate internal map
Scientists are working to determine just how precise the Chinook salmon’s personal GPS actually is when it comes to returning to ancestral feeding grounds.

(via ichthyologist)

mad-as-a-marine-biologist:

Drone films superpod of Dolphins, and Whales

Start your Monday right. 

(Source: youtube.com)